Job type

Criminologist

£23k - £36k

Typical salary

37 – 40

Hours per week

Criminologists look at the reasons why people commit crimes and find ways to reduce re-offending.

More info

  • Look at the reasons why people commit crimes and find ways to reduce re-offending
  • Requires knowledge of sociology and anthropology for understanding society and culture
  • You could work as a specialist researcher in particular offences

As a criminologist you'll focus on the study of crimes and their causes, effects, and social impact. Your responsibilities may involve analysing data to determine why the crime was committed and to find ways to predict, deter, and prevent further criminal behaviour.

DAY-TO-DAY DUTIES

  • Research the reasons why people commit crime
  • Advise policy makers in the justice and policing systems
  • Analyse data from surveys and intelligence to spot trends
  • Work on crime reduction and rehabilitation programmes
  • Recommend ways to improve the effectiveness of punishments
  • Visit prisons and probation services to speak to offenders and ex-offenders
  • Attend conferences and present research findings and teaching students at college or university

DAY-TO-DAY ENVIRONMENT

You could work in an office, in a prison or visit sites. Your working environment may be emotionally demanding and you may spend nights away from home.

You'll need

This role would be ideal for someone with knowledge of sociology and anthropology for understanding society and culture.

You'll usually need a degree in criminology, criminal justice and psychology, sociology, youth justice or law and criminology.

You can also do a postgraduate qualification in criminology. Most degree subjects are accepted as entry but relevant work experience can also be taken into account.

You could apply for a place on the Government Social Research Fast Stream programme to work in the Civil Service. You'll need an upper second class degree or better, in criminology or social sciences, to apply.

It may be helpful to join the British Society of Criminology for professional development and networking opportunities.

You'll need to pass enhanced background checks and security checks for this role.

CAREER PROSPECTS

With experience, you could become a senior policy adviser on crime and crime reduction with local or national government, the police or the probation service. You could also work as a specialist researcher in particular offences, for example online abuse, organised crime or youth offending. With further training, you might move into social or probation work, a career in law or join the security services.